The Greatest Beauty Doesn’t Talk

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2016 HAS claimed a record number of famous artists. Bookended by the shock of David Bowie succumbing to cancer and the recent passing of George Michael, Richard Adams and Carrie Fisher (Dare we tempt fate, with a few more days to go to the end of the year?), there was much talent grabbed back by the universe.

Multidisciplinary artist Tan Swie Hian keeps a regular journal of his observations that now run into several volumes. In it, he reflects on the passing of influential Canadian singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen, who died on November 7, following the release of his last album, You Want It Darker. Cohen is perhaps most celebrated for his 1984 composition Hallelujah, which has grown in stature as it journeyed through remarkable interpretations by various artists, including Jeff Buckley, Rufus Wainwright, Bon Jovi, KD Lang and Nobel Laureate Bob Dylan.

Meticulous Detail

Tan’s journals include sketches, thoughts, ideas and are artistic works in their own right. Many of them are on display at his current exhibition, Anatomy Of A Free Mind, Tan Swie Hian’s Notebooks And Creations, at the National Library Building.  In his current journal is a sketch of Cohen, with Tan’s thoughts on the life and role of the singer in pop culture.

As in anything Tan embraces, it becomes a larger, grander universal  discussion that draws upon his deep, encyclopaedic wellspring of thought, infused by his knowledge and awareness of philosophy, society, religion and current affairs.

Building on the topic of Cohen’s passing, Tan expands passionately on the pivotal role of silence in art in this video chat with STORM.sg .

Tan’s journals form part of an ongoing exhibition that showcases some of his outstanding work.

Anatomy Of A Free Mind, Tan Swie Hian’s Notebooks And Creations is currently being held at the National Library Building, Level 10, Gallery. Click HERE for more information.

You might also want to read Master Strokes Of Tan Swie Hian.

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